Mistakes parents make with their children after their divorce

New Jersey couples who have children and decide that it’s time for divorce have a tough road ahead. Apart from determining what happens to all the marital property, they’ll need to determine a solution for the custody of their children. In the process, parents tend to make some common mistakes.

Overindulging your children

A divorce can put a lot of strain on your relationship with your children. As a parent, it’s instinctual to be overprotective about the welfare of your children. You may feel that the divorce took a lot of attention away from your children and put it on to you and your former spouse. For this reason, you may try to overindulge your children. This could be buying them a bunch of gifts, treating them to extra food or even allowing them to do things that you always denied them prior to your divorce.

Criticizing your ex-spouse

Many parents end up in a very emotionally scarred state after their divorce is completed. While you may not have the best relationship with your former spouse, you need to keep that away from your children. You should never badmouth your ex-spouse in front of your children. You need to remember that they are a co-parent of your child and your child looks up to them.

Making your children choose between you and your ex-spouse

While the age of your children is going to play a big role in their involvement in the child custody process, you need to remember that you are the parent. For younger children, it’s best to work with the other parent and your divorce attorney to make up a child custody schedule that is in the best interest of the child. You should never have young children choose between you or your former spouse.

Many parents go through the process of feeling guilty and upset after a divorce. Unfortunately, sometimes this behavior can roll over into the relationships with their children. It’s important that you ensure that you’re not doing any of the practices that we went over above, as they can be damaging for the welfare of your children.

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